Today, about a year after I wrote a sample chapter and convinced Lou Rosenfeld I could pull this off, my book Content Everywhere is officially on sale.

Stack of print editions of Content Everywhere
It’s done! It’s here! Now what do I do with all these?

Some of my favorite people have even said glowing things about it. Here are a couple:

The book you’re holding is magic. It cuts through all the noise surrounding structured content and offers immediately useful ways to turn your content from a bunch of scattered pages into a strong, flexible mesh that’s ready for countless new uses. And the best part? Wachter-Boettcher walks you through all the reasoning and all the sub-steps of this process without ever losing sight of the real goal: to create and maintain lively, useful content for human beings. —Erin Kissane

Sara Wachter-Boettcher arms you with insight and courage for the content you confront—and the contexts we cannot yet imagine. —Margot Bloomstein

OMG, so that’s what I’ve been doing these years! You know that unexplainable part where I divine order from the chaos of an existing site? Well, Sara makes it systematic, repeatable, and frankly better than anything I ever did. —Jason Grigsby

If you’re making content with a single destination in mind, you’re wasting a lot of time. You should stop, read this book, and rethink the way you think about content. —Rachel Lovinger

Writing a book wasn’t easy, but I’ll admit that the hardest part wasn’t wrangling 60,000-plus words. (I mean, I’ve worked on lots of big content projects; at least I knew where all the content in this one was coming from.) It was hard in the soul-searching, what-the-hell-am-I-doing-here sort of way—the way that makes you question, with every paragraph, whether you know enough to be doing this in the first place.

But what I’ve realized is that there’s no such thing as knowing “enough.” There’s only knowing what you can, and sharing it the best you’re able to. That’s what I do with my clients, that’s what I’ve done with this blog, and so that’s what I did with the book.

So this is it—everything I had to share: A lot of ideas, some examples, and plenty of fodder to help you think about your content differently. Plus, of course, gorgeous illustrations from the delightful Eva-Lotta Lamm, and a foreword by Kristina Halvorson, who first pushed and prodded me to do this.

I hope reading it helps you half as much as writing it has helped me.


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8 Comments

  1. Ivan Ayliffe says:

    Congrats! Can’t wait to get stuck in!

    On Wed, Dec 12, 2012 at 4:26 PM, Sara Wachter-Boettcher, Content Strategist

  2. meganwhalin says:

    Congrats! Can’t wait to dig in.

  3. Sue Davis says:

    I’m half-way through and loving every page Sara. You have summed up what I’ve been trying to get to grips with as an editor, designer, IA and now a content strategist, for 15 years, so well. Thanks for putting frustrated and overlooked hunches into words!

    1. That’s so good to hear, Sue! Thank you. I hope the second half is just as good.

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